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What Is HACCP?

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is an internationally recognized method of identifying and managing food safety-related risks, and when it is the centerpiece of an active food safety program, it can provide your customers, the public, and regulatory agencies with the assurance that your food safety program is well managed.
HACCP accronym

The HACCP system, which is scientifically based and systematic, identifies specific hazards and measures for controlling them in order to assure food safety. The HACCP program includes food safety plans for controlling all types of food safety hazards across the entire food chain, from raw materials produced or obtained, through the supply of the finished food products to consumers. The manufacture of safe food products requires the HACCP system to be built on a strong base of pre-requisite programs.

 

HACCP is designed for all segments of the food processing industry, and all HACCP-based safety systems are being applied successfully. A HACCP program is used to determine the potential hazards within the food-processing system and establish controlled steps in the process for maintaining safety. The HACCP system is an internationally recognized systemic approach for identifying, handling and controlling major biological, chemical, and physical hazards associated with the production of foods.


During hazard identification, assessment, and the following operations of designing and applying a HACCP system, the effects of the inputs, ingredients, production practices, role of the production processes to address hazards, probable final product application, categories of consumers affected, and epidemiological data related to food safety should all be considered. An effective HACCP system requires minimal testing at the end-use level, as adequate, verified protections are built into the process at an early stage. If a new hazard is identified, or if any safeguards fail, a HACCP program must be revised immediately to ensure the same problems will not occur again.

 

If the hazard to be controlled is identified, but a CCP is not found, then operational re-designs should be considered. FSIS HACCP activities Meat and poultry hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) systems for meat 9 CFR Part 417 See 9 CFR 417.2 (HACCP plans for animals and animal products) HACCP for meat (FSIS) — Each establishment regulated by the [meat] industry must perform, or has performed for them, hazard analyses to identify the food safety hazards that are reasonably likely to occur during production processes and identify the preventive measures that an establishment may employ to address these hazards. Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is an internationally recognized method of identifying and managing food safety-related risks, and when it is the centerpiece of an active food safety program, it can provide your customers, the public, and regulatory agencies with the assurance that your food safety program is well managed.

 

Hazard analysis and critical control points, or HACCP,[citation needed] is a systemic, preventive approach to food safety that addresses biological, chemical, physical, and, recently, radiological hazards that may result in an unsafe final product during manufacturing processes, and develops measures to reduce biological levels to a safe level. A critical limit is a maximum and/or minimum that must be controlled for a biological, chemical, or physical parameter at the HACCP in order to prevent, eliminate, or reduce to an acceptable level, the occurrence of the food safety hazard. Critical Control Point limits are generally based on food regulatory standards and would include monitoring of some form of measure, such as temperature, weight, pH, etc. This is all to try and prevent a hazard forming or keep risks within acceptable limits.

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